Vancan Outta The Blue


Spirit Bear & Great Bear Rainforest Saved Thanks to the Power of Persistence

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Twenty years ago, a 13-year-old BC boy began an inspiring journey that just so happens to have recently reached its pinnacle moment.

Simon Jackson rose to fame with a TV special that aired in 2005. I must have watched it four or five times. The subject of that special, his quest to save the Spirit Bear or as it’s known by its true name, the Kermode bear, is officially complete.

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Simon Jackson

These gorgeous beasts can continue existing because of Simon’s work to save the Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia. I believe the bear and that land owe Simon their existence. In a day and age where we’re all so consumed by what resources we have, it’s amazing that a young, now 33-year-old Simon could convince the powers that be to make the RIGHT decisions on a matter of this nature.

Back in high school, beginning in 2005 coincidentally, I was president of the Earth Club, which I also founded. Two years later before my graduation, I insisted that we donate some of our club money from recycling, $25o to be exact, to Simon’s organization, the Spirit Bear Youth Coalition. I’m proud to say now that I and the members we had in our club 10+ years ago helped make a difference in the long term.

What really made it come full circle and confirmed to me that donating to the SBYC was actually when I met Simon in 2007 the night I was given a City of Surrey Youth Recognition Award for Community Dedication. Simon was the MC for the awards ceremony and I was lucky enough to have a conversation with him before it all began. Even then, nearly a decade before he’d reach his ultimate goal, I knew I’d just met someone who was in fact going to go on to make a gigantic difference in all of our lives. Have no doubt, this does affect everyone because now the habitat of the Kermode won’t be destroyed, leaving it a desolate wasteland. It means it can forever be enjoyed by people who respect the Earth.

Needless to say, this achievement is solid proof that a young person can do great things if he or she puts his or her mind to it and is dedicated to the cause.

If you’re interested in a summation of the events that have occurred leading up to the recent accomplishment by Simon and what it all means, check out this post. SERIOUSLY, DO IT!!! 

Also make sure to give a looksie at his latest endeavours, CoalitionWILD and Ghost Bear Photography. Better yet, shoot him a follow on Twitter @dSimonJackson.

Thanks for reading. Until next time, peace.

(All photos courtesy Simon Jackson/Ghost Bear Photography)

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Proving I Can Still Do This Thing…

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It’s official…

I’m doing the Spartan Sprint September 4th at Heritage Ranch in Red Deer, Alberta.

If you follow my blog and my other social media accounts, you may have in recent months read that I had a huge goal to accomplish. This is it.

I actually didn’t intend to do it until 2017 but my ulcerative colitis (IBD) has gone so far into remission and I’ve been feeling so good that I decided to take the plunge this year. I didn’t actually realize it was still eight months away until I looked for the first time two weeks ago.

I’m feeling so well that I am going to openly lay it all out for you right here and make my vow public to train my ass off for this event. The sprint is the shortest of the three main Spartan races (sprint, super and beast) at 5km and 15-20 obstacles. Despite that, I’m going to have to train hard because I’ll admit I’m a long way off from where I need to be. I get winded running (walking) up the stairs at work. I’m seeing a dietitian, I’ve got a gym pass, and I’m in remission thanks to a wonderful drug named remicade that allows me to not worry so much about my disease.

The thing is as much as I was an athlete for the first 18 years of my life, UC changed that aspect of my life almost instantly. I’ve gone almost nine years now with a level of

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Proof I was a runner! That singlet even has my name on the back. 

conditioning I can only describe as pathetic compared to my heydays as a soccer, hockey and lacrosse playing, cross-country running, 100m, 200m and relay sprinting, javelin, discus and shotput throwing, 1500m racewalking(Surrey Champ x2), tennis ball swatting, gross and sweaty son of a gun. Frankly, you don’t really need to have great conditioning to play the type of golf I do now.

The reason I’m doing this?

To prove to myself that I can still lead an active life and get back to some semblance of what I was nine years ago when I was very nearly bringing up the year at the 2006-07 Provincial Cross-Country championships in Victoria. I was an athlete but I was never an all-star okay (still more of one than John Scott though).

I want to prove that people with inflammatory bowel disease can live an active life and be a beast on the course and in life. I want to prove I can eat healthy because I’d be a liar if I said that colitis hasn’t affected the way I eat in a major, major way.

I want to prove to my daughter and fiancee that I know how to strive for something successfully.

I’m going to be successful, no matter how many burpees I end up having to do. That’s the punishment for failing an obstacle on the Spartan course, 30 to be exact.

With all that said, I want to thank once again anyone reading this and anyone who’s ever encouraged me to stick with it through my battle with colitis. I wouldn’t be at this point without you.

This is also a plea to anyone reading who has colitis and more specifically, anyone with IBD in the Red Deer area. If you’d like to join my team, the GUTSY GLADIATORS, please let me know. You don’t even have to have IBD, you can join my team to show your support for those with IBD.

Contact me by commenting on this post.

I’ll finish with a quote: “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.” – Wayne Gretzky



The Canucks Sisters and Misters

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This isn’t about me but let the record show this is my first hockey-related post in quite some time.

I could spit out a few numbered tweets but this feels like the right time to put electronical pen to paper and share my thoughts on the blog I once tried so hard to keep up.

So how about those Canuckleheads eh?!

I’m going to address two things here.

Numero uno:

The ‘sisters’ act is old.

(Warning: long sentence) It’s a promise of mine to you that anyone who is intelligent when it comes to hockey hears you refer to Daniel and Henrik Sedin as sisters, they are hearing someone who is not only unintelligent about hockey, but someone who is so insecure in their own life, they must refer to two world-class hockey players as such.

I think even the people who refer to the twins as sisters know that women can be great at the sport in 2016. Obviously the intended connotation is that the twins play like little whiny, wussy flopping, diving, baby girls. Of course that’s too assume that all little girls are just that (which they’re not, but I digress).

Let’s be blunt here: if you call the Sedin twins sisters with any intended meaning, you sound like a complete tool. Lest we forget Henrik once played 679 straight regular season games. Lest we forget Hank playing like a beast when his bro went down for 19 games with a broken foot in 2009.

How about just last week when Daniel had his face smashed by vulcanized rubber, losing three or four chiclets in the process, only to come back to the game and score a goal, which by the way he now has 346 of in his career? That’s not a total one achieves by laying down and playing like a big wuss his entire career.

The use of the word sister in this context, as I’m sure we all know, is sexist. It does imply that women can’t play hockey or that women can’t play hockey tough, both of which are certifiably wrong, trust me. So the next time you call the Sedin twins sisters, know that it seems as if you have never watched them play in your entire life and that you really don’t know jack about hockey or how they play the game (along the boards/dirty areas their entire careers).

Between the end of the 3rd period and start of Overtime between the Canucks and Panthers Monday night, a Florida player (allegedly) said something to or about the twins. Daniel said after the game it was one guy and he knows who he is. Any Canucks fan should know who it was too and even Botchford provides some pretty undeniable GIF proof.

Let me just finish this topic off by saying that if *cough* Shawn Thornton *cough* really did make a ‘sisters’ remark, then Daniel Sedin, the ‘low-life’ that he is had pretty much free rein after he scored that GWG in OT. I would be disappointed actually if Daniel (or Henrik) didn’t skate by the bench and say something like, “How do ya like me now biznitches,” or, “How’s that for a sister biznitches?”

And two:

I’m ashamed to say that up to this point in the season, I have been a card-carrying member of #TankNation. Yup, I’ve hashtagged it on Twitter and grown accustomed to the likelihood this season will end poorly once again, very quickly. It started off pretty decent but the tailspin began after the two week mark and with Auston Matthews perched at the top of the draft rankings, it should make any crappy team’s fans salivate.

I’m tired of mediocrity as a Canucks fan and as a hardcore lifer, I’m allowed to feel that way. I know I’m not the only one. We all want ownership to give the management team the go-ahead to do whatever it takes and Linden/Benning probably have that freedom, but at times this season and in the past, it’s been a lot of talk and no walk.

By mediocrity, I don’t just mean always being the bridesmaid three times and never the bride, I also mean having bad seasons, but ones just not crappy enough to get one of those top notch NHL-ready players at the draft. This of course doesn’t count 1999, but even then, the twins went back to Sweden for a season. It also doesn’t count 1988 of course.

If we are going to miss the playoffs, we might as well really miss them and get something impactful for the rest of the re-build (or re-tooling on the fly).

HOWEVER, after last night’s streak-halting victory over the Seattle/Quebec/Las Vegas/Portland/Milwaukee/Hamilton Panthers who I’m sure had plenty of people watching their webcast, there may just be hope for this Canucks team yet. They’ve got a long way to go still to prove they can hang with the Kings of the world, or of the Pacific, but there is hope.

Mark my words, if the Canucks make a run past the second round of the playoffs, Monday’s win will have been the turning point. I say past the second round because in this division, if L.A. remains the sole really good team, the Canucks could make it in as a mediocre team but still get a mediocre first-round opponent.

So in the words of Aragorn, “there is always hope.” #TankNation is still alive and well to be sure, and there still needs to be convincing done on my part, but better days may lie ahead with guys like Horvat, Virtanen, McCann, Etem, Sutter, Markstrom, and yes, the Sedins, all contributing at once.

Monday was a bonding experience for this team, this group of men, of Misters, have no doubt.

Start praying to the hockey gods Canucks fans they’ll use that experience wisely going forward.

ADDENDUM: To all the Canucks fans on Twitter last night going apes*** over Potvin’s commentary and idiotic Panthers fans, shame on you. The vitriol I observed was appalling and it’s no wonder Canucks nation seemingly has an average of IQ of about 44. There’s this thing called retaliation and it can be acted out in the form of words as much as it can in the actions of a hockey game. Next time we win, and somebody cuts our players down, don’t stoop even lower than that.

You know who you are.



I’m OKAY, In Case You Were Wondering…

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Disclaimer: Any post on this website that pertains to IBD or ulcerative colitis may contain TMI for some people. Please read at your own discretion.

Okay, okay, okay, okay, okay, okay…OKAY! I’m okay. I want you all to know that. I went a little off the deep end yesterday.

Had you read what I posted to Facebook and Twitter Thursday, you may think otherwise but I can assure you I’m on the right path. Does the possibility remain that my health could get worse before it gets better? Yes. Do I plan on laying back and not putting up a fight? No.

Before I share yesterday’s post for context, I’ll point out this is my first post on my website/blog in while and I realize it’s really got nothing to do with sports, which is what my blog has always been focused around. Subscribers can expect to see more posts related to this topic and new visitors can expect to be directed here again in the future rather than reading a long-ish post on Facebook.

Here’s yesterday’s post:

Please read…

I can easily say this is the lowest point I’ve been at with my ‪#‎colitis‬.

I’m extremely grateful to those in my life that I live and work with every day though. I hope if you’re one of those people, you know that.

I’m desperate for the drugs to start working, the real drugs, not the bullshit band-aids that are the steroids and other supplementary meds which by the way have caused me numerous side effects.

If you know of my recent struggles you’ll know I’m open to admitting I have mental/psychological issues because of the far reaching effects of the colitis. Not easy for anyone to admit at the best of times but I’ve seen the ill effects of holding that stuff in.

I already told one person today I feel pitiful.

I’m down. Way down. But I love the idea of life too much to ever give up. I know I’ve asked for prayers and good vibes and really…it’s impossible to quantify how much impact those have but please feel free. I also accept spoons (‪#‎spoontheory‬).

I and many like me are desperate for a cure. I know I’m not the only one suffering from ‪#‎IBD‬ or a chronic illness in general and I know many have it much worse..as bad as my situation is.

I’ll get through it. I’m going to keep telling myself that because it’s true. I’m 6 feet over, not under. Some days though — today — I question everything.

“That which does not kill us makes us stronger.” -Friedrich Nietzsche

Please help find a cure by visiting http://www.crohnsandcolitis.ca.

Just because today I’m saying I’m okay doesn’t mean anything from that post was false or untrue or an exaggeration. I stand by what I said 100 per cent. I am at the lowest point I’ve ever been. I am near what I would call rock bottom, knowing full well that physically and mentally, it could get worse before it gets better. Thursday and today were the first two days I’ve actually missed full days of work exclusively because of my colitis and its far reaching affects.

I felt like I owed this update — 24 hours later — to everyone because so many have followed me for so long, whether it was when I was writing every day about hockey or because I post news articles I write for work, or for my recent attempts at bringing awareness to IBD (Crohn’s and colitis).

It is of utmost importance to me going forward to be selfish in the respect that I won’t hold back posting about mental health and obviously what IBD and colitis are all about. It is an invisible disease without a cure. There is no fix for what I and many others have, just band-aids. Unfortunately getting to a goosfraba or OM state is a lot easier said than done sometimes, as much as it’s recommended and encouraged. So that said, I will continue to post about my issues with the hope that someone out there having similar problems will see my positivity or my story that isn’t too much different from their own. Hopefully that person will be inspired in some form to keep their head up and not let a disease control their life.

I am fully aware there are a lot of people in this world, even in my own life, that have to deal with worse than I do. Yes, as bad as my raw deal is, others suffer more. I feel for those people. I am with those people. I am a support for those people as much as people are a support for me. That’s what I can offer those people. I can’t promise I’ll selflessly promote awareness about every disease on this planet, but I can pay it forward by being a compassionate human being who can relate to going through the daily pain of chronic illness. That is how I have and will give back.

If you are ever stuck on how to help me because you have no idea what I’m deaing with, I’ll tell you right now that offering up an ear or two just to listen to me goes so much further than most people think.

I’m paused at the moment not exactly sure how to continue. I know there’s so much I want to say but this is where I’d remind everyone perhaps that I want you to ask me about my disease. I want to spread the word. I want people to know about something not a lot of people know a lot about because without telling my story and without others like me telling their’s, a cure will surely never be discovered. I know I’m going to leave stuff out of this post but please ask me anything you ever want to know.

I didn't know this until today. This is why many others on remicade refer to it as mouse juice.

I didn’t know this until today. This is why many others on remicade refer to it as mouse juice.

I recently found out I lost close to 20 pounds in a six week span. I went from 145 to 125 after having my third infusion of Remicade (Infliximab) and that was certainly a jolt to my depression. I’ve always been a pretty slim kid, a runner for a decade in school, playing soccer, hockey, lacrosse and lord knows what other sports. So it was never a big deal my size but now that I’ve lost weight when I want to gain it, but physically can’t, I struggle with how to deal with this. I haven’t eaten a lot in that span, because any food amounting to more than a small meal for a normal person, and I have issues that cause me some distress. I obviously can’t gain weight if I don’t eat and let’s be honest, taking Vitamin D and B12 tablets just isn’t going to solve this issue by themselves. So now I’m skinny as hell. I hate looking at myself without a shirt on.

You could honestly find a meatier rack of ribs at Montana’s Cookhouse.

I’ve struggled extra hard since May. Yes I had an accident. Yes a car was involved. It was however not what people commonly refer to as a car accident though. That was one of the harshest realities I’ve faced with my colitis and it’s affected my brain ever since. I have the fear of god in me every time I know I have to leave the house and yes I travel everywhere with a roadside emergency kit. Imagine having to live like that…every single damn day. I wake up, bathroom. I shower and get dressed, bathroom, for hours before I can leave for work. I arrive, bathroom. I have to go the scene of a fire, bathroom. I leave the scene of the fire, where’s the nearest grocery store or gas station? I eat something, bathroom. Time to head home, bathroom. Bed time, bathroom. It’s bloody awful, thankfully for me for the last four or five years, not literally bloody. If that’s TMI, for you, well, sorry not sorry.

Then there are all the drugs (remicade, prednisone, lomotil, pantoprozol, iron infusions and those are just the ones I’m on) and conversations with doctors and nurses and case managers and drug coordinators. I had a blood test this week, another next week. I have an infusion next week. I have to do a stool test this weekend (happy happy joy joy). In October, I’ll have my second colonoscopy since May (also hurrah…not). A big plus though that I cannot not mention is the quality of care I’ve received since moving to Alberta. Second to none hands down in all the years I’ve had this stupid affliction.

I went golfing last Saturday and those four hours of frustrating joy meant not eating all day. I didn't get home until 4:30 p.m.

I went golfing last Saturday and those four hours of frustrating joy meant not eating all day. I didn’t get home until 4:30.

This morning I came up with a potential resolution for 2016. This plan can only be initiated if the drugs start to work though. I’m not going to share the details because then I’ll be getting my hopes up on it and last time I got my hopes up for something too quickly (the remicade), I became depressed because it wasn’t having the desired affect. Hopefully it still does but that’s not the point. The point is if they do begin to work, I have something exciting to share with you all a few months from now. First, I need to prove to myself I can gain some weight and I can get some fitness back.

Here is how I’ll close. Today it came closer than ever to full circle for me in terms of realizing how great of an employer I have in the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group. Obviously I also know my family has my back and I have friends that support me. I will not give up on the notion that better days lie ahead for me and while it sucks to play the waiting game and wonder if anything really is ever going to change, I know I don’t have a choice. During that time I have to be all my body will let me be, physically, mentally, socially and even spiritually.

Hell, I also have to prepare myself for the day (which will come sooner than I think) my daughter understands better what is going on with her Daddy. I have to be strong for her. I have to be strong for my fiancee. I have to be strong for myself because if it’s going to get worse, it won’t be because of anything I do.

So I’m okay. I’m not great. I’m not good. I’m chronically ill. I’ve been sick every day for the last eight years. And I’ve cried many times over the last several weeks and months. I’m tired, but I am okay and I know it will get better.

Shoutout to @Offseids and @ColitisNinja for being two wonderful supports for me lately. Please check out Colitis Ninja on Facebook and Twitter for a lot of great info on Crohn’s and colitis. You can also buy wristbands and other things that support research. Please also check out http://www.crohnsandcolitis.ca.


Wrangling from the play-by-play booth
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Home playoff game #1 (Game 3 vs, Chase Heat) February 28th, 2014

It’s not a level of hockey too many of us are familiar with but it’s one that in the past seven months I’ve come to know is very competitive and full of driven young men.

Junior B hockey is played in BC via the Pacific Junior Hockey League (PJHL), Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League (VIJHL), and Kootenay International Junior Hockey League (KIJHL).  The latter is the one I was privileged enough to be engaged with. Specifically this past season, I called play-by-play for the expansion/relocated 100 Mile House Wranglers.

The Wranglers organization was staffed by completely different people from the previous season, from the General Manager to the skate sharpener to the backup goalie. You could count on one hand the number of players who weren’t KIJHL rookies. It was Penticton, the former home of the Lakers, where the franchise moved from by the way. For all intents and purposes though, they were expansion.

In their first season, the 100 Mile Wranglers had the best attendance in the league, and squashed all expectations of them. They not only had a winning record and narrowly missed out on home-ice advantage in the first round of the playoffs, they won a playoff series.  To give you some perspective, the team they beat, the Chase Heat had made the post-season for the first time in that franchise’s three year history. In Chase’s first season, 2011-12, they won 5 of 52 games. The Wranglers won 23 in their inaugural campaign.

Even I, a rookie broadcaster, was skeptical of how the team would do, but there I was, up in the ‘booth’ for every home goal and every home win this team racked up to kick off its franchise history. I put booth in quotation marks because it wasn’t truly one. The South Cariboo Rec. Centre was not particularly set up for a junior team at first, so an actual booth, rather than a table at the top of Section C just inches right of dead centre ice, is likely still a few years away. I’m not complaining, though what’s unreal was the amount of times the 3rd period Canadian 2-for-1 fan pizza delivery promotion wound up going to someone just seats away from me, usually in the aforementioned Section C. I didn’t hesitate to comment on that during the webcasts either because oh were the aromas palpable?!

How can I forget the OT controversies, or the first broken pane of glass which occurred during warm-up of a mid-season game? To this day, I still don’t know who shot it. How about ‘Kick-start My Heart to begin each warm-up? Or getting player pronunciations from opposing team members? Or that time all the players bleached their hair for playoffs and I asked the Head Coach, “Why isn’t your hair blonde?” He said, “Because I’m not 18.” Meanwhile, Assistant Coach Richard Duff is q-tipped. Ah the memories.

What’s weird is for as much as I want to be some great sportscaster one day, covering the Canucks from somewhere other than my, “mom’s basement,” I always said play-by-play was one thing I’d never do, or that I was more of a colour man. By the end of the season, my head could have been larger than Rob Ford’s gut, but I harkened back to my days at Columbia Academy where many an instructor told me to never let that happen. I was humbled by the bushels of unexpected compliments the rest of my webcast team and I received. You know what? I think play-by-play may be a path I can take in the future and I’m super excited about that. A tidbit of information I’ll always hold dear was that the first hockey game I ever called , a pre-season matchup Hundred Mile won 7-2 over Kamloops, was on the eve of what would have been my dad’s 47th birthday, September 11th. He would be proud.

As mentioned, I was wary of the Wranglers’ chances this season so I can say with certainty I would have had just as much fun and got just as much, if not more out of it, had they gone on to win just five games all year. I got lucky.

And I didn’t just learn how to become a better broadcaster, I learned more about the game. Someone told me during the course of the season that you should never think you know everything about something, in my case, hockey. I took that to heart and asked questions and listened intently and educated myself on the inner workings of junior hockey. It’s not an easy venture for these kids. You don’t just grab your hockey gear, hop in your car, fill up the gas tank, drive to _________ (insert town here), try out, make the team, and play all year. That sounds like a lot but that would actually make it super easy. Again, we’re talking about kids, teenagers, high schoolers, who are provinces, sometimes even a country away from their parents, and as anyone who’s in the know about how junior hockey works, they’re paying to play, sometimes a pretty nice chunk of change, but they do it because they’re passionate and love the game of hockey, and because they were raised right, driven to the rinks sometimes hours away (a la Carey Price), just for practice, let alone games and/or tournaments. #RunOnSentence

One young gentleman I had the pleasure of meeting this season was the Wranglers first ever Captain, #11 Jaidan Ward. Ward was devastated by season’s end because he never even got to appear in a single playoff game in his final season of junior. The weekend before playoffs began, he suffered another concussion, his 2nd or 3rd of the season. I saw him at the rink before, during, and after each home game of the playoffs and his head was high, and he said he still talked to his teammates before and after every game, like a great Captain should have. He’s 20 years old now and won’t play junior hockey ever again. Those games, those moments on the ice were stolen from him and I felt for him during the final fleeting moments of the season. He is one hockey player I will never forget meeting.

Then there was the GM and Head Coach Doug Rogers, who’d formerly coached in this league but was away from it for several years before returning to take the helm of the 100 Mile House Wranglers. What a task but what an amazing job he did. He taught me many things but probably the easiest to pick out is that hard work isn’t just a cliché. That was the mantra all season long, preached by him, the players, and the fans who bought into it. Why not hard work? Hockey isn’t easy, and this is a competitive league. Hard work is all you have to lean on at times. One thing is for sure, each and every single one of the 700+ fans that attended each of those four home playoff games appreciated the hard work Rogers, his fellow coaches, trainers and players exerted on the ice. It wasn’t a championship team but they earned their respect very early on, and from all 19 other teams who realized that the Wranglers were here to play, not to be kicked around.

My whole point is that Junior B hockey, the KIJHL, is surrounded by great people who’ll teach you things when you least expect it. It was through reporting on this team, doing the play-by-play for them, and simply being a fan that I learned more about respecting  the game, especially in the sense that while it’s competitive and that, “you play to win the game,” it’s a fun game. It sounds so cliché, but from being a minor hockey coach who tells his players to always have fun right up to being a play-by-play broadcaster who was witnessed by many people on multiple nights waving his playoff towel while calling a goal at the same time, this game is fun.

I could not have been more honoured to be a part of the 100 Mile Wranglers first ever season in the KIJHL, and then to MC their awards banquet just two days after the team was eliminated. It was sad to see it end and without a doubt, I’d love if the team were still playing and I could be back up there in the ‘booth’ right now, but that will have to wait a few months, coincidentally around the same time I’ll become a father and be planning a wedding that will be less than a year away when the new season starts. I hope my kid one day plays hockey and sees the fun I’ve been able to find in it, because there aren’t many other types of fun like the one you’ll discover on the ice, top shelf, along the half-boards, at the point, in the neutral zone, and behind the mic, calling a hockey game.



NWSB – Draft grades and analysis for Canucks 1st round
July 2, 2013, 10:39
Filed under: General

Twitter-Full-LogoNWSB Canucks blogger Josh Hall recaps the 2013 NHL draft for the Vancouver Canucks two first round picks. Josh points out it finally happened Sunday as the Canucks traded away goalie Cory Schneider to the New Jersey Devils.In return they got to pick Bo Horvat, then with their second 1st round pick they chose Hunter Shinkaruk. A good day for Van City. Mike Gillis certainly isn’t making it easy to form an opinion on him. Time will tell all.

READ FULL STORY: Draft grades and analysis for Canucks 1st round



A Locked Out Fan: Volume One
September 17, 2012, 21:03
Filed under: General | Tags: , , , , ,

Josh Hall, 100 Mile House – They say there’s a first for everything and as the title suggests, this is the first volume in what shall be a periodic update from a lonesome and locked out fan.

Unfortunately, this is not the first time in our lifetime we’ve had to sit and ponder the meaning of life while our heroes on ice battle with their bosses.

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A shot to the heart is what this lockout is. Higgy knows…

If this is the first time in your lifetime, you’re too young to be on the internet, so get off of it now.

If you heard your older sibling talking about my writing and asked them to print it off for you, then you are very resourceful for a 6 year old and I predict that you shall do well in life.

Anyways, what I would like this (hopefully short) series to be about is what hockey means to a guy like me, a fan of the game and my team until the day I drop dead in a doughnut factory.

Don Koharski would be proud.

Seriously though, it’s been 48 hours since the NHL locked out its players and that is a travesty. It never should have gone this far. Regardless of which side you are on at this very moment, the two sides have had months and months to negotiate a new deal.

Yet for some reason they decided to wait until a month and a half ago to commence the needed deliberations.

I stand firmly on the side of the players though. Today on Facebook, I got into a debate with someone as I am almost certain many of you reading this have as well, again regardless of which side you’re on.

This was my penultimate comment that pretty much sums up why I take the side of the players:

“The issue is that players have signed contracts and are being asked to take major pay cuts of around 20%. The issue here is the NHLPA bowed to the NHL’s commands already 7 years ago. The issue is that now the NHL is asking the NHLPA once again to take less money. The NHLPA should be commended because they have offered to take less than what they’ve been receiving the last 7 years which is 57%. They have actually offered to take around 52%. The issue here is the greedy Mr. Bettman and the owners who even the week leading up the lockout officially being announced were handing out huge contract extensions to star players (Alex Burrows, Evander Kane, Kari Lehtonen) and yet they complain that players are making too much. People wouldn’t have jobs if there were no customers, we get that but that is not the major issue. Check out TSN, you’ll see a video of Carey Price telling the fans how much they just want to get back on the ice and play the game because without they feel lost. I firmly stand by the players because they have done nothing but concede and concede more.”

Maybe you agree with me and maybe you don’t but we all as fans have a common desire. That would be to see some hockey games.

Perhaps I am biased because at one point I wanted to be in the NHL, albeit when I was very young.

Perhaps it’s the straight up fact that players like the Leafs’ James Reimer and Habs’ Mathieu Darche stating that they want to play simultaneous to a new CBA being negotiated. However, the owners won’t have any of that.

I mean who cares about pre-season really? Not this guy! To be perfectly honest, I’m happy to see the Canucks just skating together right now so I’m not even too concerned about a training camp.

Of course if a deal is to be reached in time for the regular season to start on time, there’s still the case of Roberto Luongo to be dealt with. What an off-season eh?! It’d sure be funny if it were more eventful than the 2012-13 regular season.

[random thoughts due to lost and confused hockey mind = dangerous]

To close, I’ll just say that I remain optimistic although I certainly don’t have any reason to be. I’m not a TSN Hockey Insider and I don’t yet have Mike Gillis on speed-dial so I can’t dish you the latest rumours and secrets from the bargaining table.

I will have Mike Gillis on speed-dial. Oh yes, I will have Mike Gillis on speed-dial.

Maybe I am optimistic because I see too much good that can be lost if the owners and players don’t get their scheisse together.

So I’ll sit here on my couch, writing these things, watching Monday Night Raw (don’t judge me), continuing to hit the twit (tweet) and hope that there really are Hockey Gods because with the distance between both sides right now, it seems that maybe they’re the only ones who can save us now.




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